Extraordinary adventures change lives. So we create bikepacking, packrafting and bikerafting missions for and with you to remote regions of the Four Corners. Unplug, play hard and discover more. What’s your tour?

Scullbinder Ranch — The Four Corners Guides Basecamp

In 2017, Steve “Doom” Fassbinder and Lizzy Scully purchased 35 high-desert acres at the confluence of Weber Canyon and the Mancos River Valley. They spent two years constructing their base camp—the Scullbinder Ranch Community Barn Lodge—from 75% repurposed materials, including barn wood from Kansas and flooring from Johnny Cash’s mom’s house, among hundreds of other things. The smell of sage permeates the grounds, glamping tents and the Lodge’s loft offer comfortable sleeping options, mountain bike trails line the property and migratory birds fly up the canyons each spring and fall. This Ranch that Doom and Lizzy are caretaking in this lifetime is the original home of the Ancestral Puebloans, and lies on the border of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Park and Mesa Verde National Park.  You can follow their progress on Instagram @Scullbinderranch.

Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Park Tour – Go With a Legend

Tours Now Scheduled for Fall 2021!

“Steve “Doom” Fassbinder is known for completing nearly impossible adventures, like biking and rafting 1,000 miles across Tajikistan. The guy has an uncanny ability to suffer-early in his career, he was a repeat 24-Hour mountain-bike-racing world champ. Since leaving the racing scene, Doom has made a name for himself by piecing together creative multi-day routes around the world that require mountain bikes, packrafts, and the occasional llama. The customized tours launch from Fassbinder’s 35-acre Scullbinder Ranch. One of the trips includes special access to nearby Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Park, 125,000 acres of protected lands adjacent to popular Mesa Verde National Park, with a fraction of the visitors. You’ll bikepack for three days through the park’s dusty canyons, fording the Mancos River to meet Wolf, a Ute Mountain Ute guide who’ll take you up wooden ladders into Native cliff dwellings. The tour finishes with a 40-mile gravel grind back to the ranch, hitting tiny downtown Mancos, where a craft beer on the outdoor patio at Mancos Brewing Company awaits. Because what’s a bike ride without a post-ride beer?” ~Outside Magazine, “27 Epic Trips You Should Start Planning for Now!”

Bikepacking the Navajo Nation
Bikepacking is the synthesis of mountain biking and minimalist camping, where you explore large, contiguous landscapes via singletrack trails, gravel and dirt roads, carrying only essential items you need to survive. To learn more, visit BikepackingRoots.org or Bikepacking.com.

Packrafts are lightweight, inflatable boats used to “turn the blue lines on maps into trails,” as Luc Mehl, author of, “The Packraft Handbook” says. Because they weigh less than 10 pounds, it’s easy to carry them in a backpack or on a bike in order to pass through or get to remote landscapes that would otherwise be inaccessible.

So what is bikerafting exactly? Simply put, it’s a human-powered, multi-sport adventure activity whereby you use bicycles and packrafts, carrying one on the other depending on the terrain you’re crossing. Regardless of the length of a trip–single-day urban explorations or multi-day backcountry missions–if you ride a bike and then switch to amphibious mode and paddle a packraft across a waterway, while carrying that bike, you are bikerafting.